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friend, he and i have been together and political offices, a government responsibility for a very long time. more than three years. when he decided not to run again and my other colleague who was part of team north dakota was defeated, it was less rewarding for me personally to be here. less enjoyable for me to be here. i am sure that played a role. >> in your speech yesterday, you used the expression of the senate we efforts right yesterday, as the world's greatest deliberative body. do you think the public shares that perception? >> probably not. [laughter] we're efficient at producing results. -- deficient at producing results. what i also said yesterday was a there are problems here. the problems i believe are very clear is that we spend too much time trying to seek political advantage, too little time focused on solving the country's problems. i am sure that had a role in my decision as well. i really came here wanting to do big things. wanted to work on solving problems. there is been much less an emphasis on that lately and much more of an emphasis on how you get over on the oth
of slavery? well, last week the federal government as it does, you know, once or twice a year came out with its latest figures on birthrights. and in particular on one i'm going to point to is the illegitimacy rate or out-of-wedlock births. here they are. 72.3% of african-americans now are born out of wedlock. 72.3%. american indians, 66.2%. latinos, it's 53.3%. for whites it's still pretty high, but it's 29.1 percent. and for asians it's 17.2%. so in other words, seven out of ten, six out of ten, five out of ten for blacks, american end yangs and latinos. these are the so-called underrepresented minorities that get racial preferences. and then fewer than three out of ten and fewer than two out of ten for whites and aiz items -- asians, people who are typically discriminated against. it is no accident that these figures line up quite well with how well different groups are doing not only in terms of education, but in terms of crime and, you know, whatever social indicator you want. that is the real problem. and, of course, that is not going to be fixed by racial preferences and univers
boundary to implement. the order required the government to obtain a warrant and show probable cause. these are the same basic commonsense protections we've had in place for other types of searches. this development required individualized and particular orders from the fisa court to conduct investigations. let's fast forward to 2001. president bush decided in secret to authorize the national security agency to start a new program of warrantless surveillance inside the united states. this is in complete contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress ex
. the government gets the money from us. i do not see how they have the right to sit there and play politics with each other and try to make decisions that are going to just benefit them. maybe a small part of the population. this is the united states. we're supposed to be tried to help everybody. we cannot be scared of what is clear to happen to us when many people are barely able to meet their bills. they may have to be afraid of what is going to happen to them. what kind of government would do that to their people? they should try to make us feel calm. like we are really going to get something done. host: from crawford, indiana this morning. on twitter -- another tweet i want to read this morning -- jodi wrtes in -- we will be taking your calls all of this morning for this segment and the next segment on the "washington journal." we told you what was going on in the senate. here is "roll-call" newspaper and what is being prepped in the house today -- alan ota writes, the speaker made it clear -- that is what is going on in the house. let's go to charles on a republican line from maryland.
that is so bloated? why is that so radical? >> they are trying to secede from the u.s. government. >> get out of here. don't be so intellectually dishonest. get out of here. >> okay. >> i always have this test. if you are staying in a hotel and you have to share a bathroom with somebody who would you rather a tea party supporter or occupy wall streeter? >> i would need a raid pretension tent. >> bill will be back on january 2 for the start of the factor new season. please remember the spin stops here because we're looking out captioned by closed capt services, inc. >> sean: and this is a fox news alert. earlier today in a pathetic last minute effort to avoid the nation falling off the fiscal cliff president arnold palmer took a mini break from the golf schedule to summon congressional leaders to the white house. a last minute mini deal could be struck before the end of the year that would preserve tax cuts for the middle class and preserve unemployment benefits. the president raced to the microphones and said the following after this meeting. watch. >> i just had a good and constr
don't want toyite yait a government? why is that so radical? >> they're coming up with crazy ideas every day. >> please, get out of here. get out of here. >> yes. okay. >> i have this test if you're like staying in a hotel and have to share a bathroom who would it be? a tea party supporter or occupy wall streeter? >> i would say tea party. >> if i had occupy, boy need a rape prevention kit. there are tons of raid cals and idiots as i call them. >> thanks for watching tonight. i'm greg gut feld. bill will be back for the start of the factor's new season january 2. please remember, the spin stops here because we're looking out for you. captioned by closed capt services, inc. >> sean: and this is a fox news alert. earlier today in a pathetic last minute effort to avoid the nation falling off the fiscal cliff president arnold palmer took a mini break from the golf schedule to summon congressional leaders to the white house. a last minute mini deal could be struck before the end of the year that would preserve tax cuts for the middle class and preserve unemployment benefits. the preside
of government. frankly nothing but a pathetic disgrace. you the american people deserve a government that lives within its means. you deserve a government that is not obsessed with using your money to accumulate their power. it is time for americans to understand the simple truth of what is going on here. a truth by the way that an abusively biased news media just ignores. joining us now with reaction as america is on the brink republican senators pat toomey and ron johnson. senators, welcome back. >> hi, sean. >> hi, sean. >> sean: let's start with the meeting today. senator toomey, i'm told that the president wassed adamant n the meeting and didn't come off, are the original request was to keep tax rates at the same for the middle class but everybody above $250,000 going up. is that what you heard? >> i haven't heard about specific elements of the conversation, sean, i wasn't in the room. what i do understand from people who were there is that is sounds for the first time like the president is actually engaged and actually would prefer that we not go over the cliff. clear previously.en leer
-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "roll call." "it could be reached over this weekend." were heard from the house rules committee chairman yesterday. they are taking steps in advance to extend these tax cuts. a deal could be on the floor today if there is an agreement. from "the washington times" this morning. "offers fly, but still no agreement" is the headline. mitch mcconnell bypassed senator reid to speak directly to the vice president
] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth annual sitting. the sitting have become an accomplished part of the parking parliament calendar. -- they have become so well established. and leader of the house, i am the representative of the government to this house of commons. and of the house of commons to the government. but today i am pleased to be able to be here to representative both the government and the house with you the youth parliament. i know, what is said here today will be heard both
smaller increases to social security over time, why it would be a saving to the government. whether you like that or not it is actually not a terrible idea even though i'm going to get another bunch of tweets from people who said it is not terrible, may not be ideal. why are we having this conversation with a day and a half to go? 500-some-odd days ago they came one this concept of a sequester. they knew the fiscal cliff was coming. 12 years' notice we had these bush tax cuts were going to expire. these kind of discussions require air they require time they require debate and we are now having them. when john thune says he hopes that senator reid brings a bill to the floor and it is open to discussion and amendment, not today. not today. it's too late for that. make a deal and stop markets from going over the edge, stop this economy from going over the edge. they will ruin a good economy, martin this is ridiculous, irresponsible, disgusting behavior. >> you don't want to hear this kind of detailed conversation going on now? >> no. no. >> you want to get a deal done? >> forget t no more
't he accepting it ne fuel? >> it would cause drawing up laws to govern what the pressure should do. this really was a question of the heart of all of this. how could you make sure that everybody was involvinged incluesing publishers that aren't to do so without the piece of legislation that would amount enemies of the system sucting to licensing. the law had to change. talks use similar language that would simply recognize an independent regulator in raw. this debate went for months and months and months. they were joined. it would billion far more something more owneress. that's what david cameron was addressing in some of of his concerns. how did it feel? >> we saw something rather by zard there. we heard from the two men, the prime minister and the deputy frimse. there were -- separation. one of those two men thinks new law is skential and the other not is not. >> in the backgrounds for a moment, you've got the last few months. will continue to cross party talks. but simultaneously you also god the crime city. try now that new regulator could be brought in into this new law if i
difficult for the federal government. people are wary of all of the uncertainty. they are keeping their pocketbooks closed during this all-important spending season. do you see that as an interesting perspective? >> i think at this point, here you have this santa claus rally which is a market phenomenon that makes sense until it doesn't. that works until it doesn't. coming into this season we would have a typical 1.7% increase in the s&p 500. now, we are dealing with questions that will remain unanswered until january. that uncertainty makes investors anxious. tracy: we have for trading days left. what should we be doing? what should people be doing over the course of the next couple trading days? >> i think people should really look at their capital gains. we are at a point now where capital gains is going up. it makes sense to take him and reposition them when we find out what will happen. lori: i have to tell you, i think stocks are the place to be. stocks, even emerging market stocks, there is a lot of strategy. how would you recommend it? >> i think equity because bond yields
geithner. it could delay the tax filings. the government relies on august revenue to come in and it usually comes flooding in during march and april. people need to pay their taxes, but they don't know which tax rules will apply. host: the other deadline is the debt limit. here at $16.4 trillion. guest: >> the treasury department can stop funding federal pensions and do some other maneuvers, essentially to buy them another six weeks of time. we all at this last year. closer they get to that is when financial markets will start going crazy. the debates we are having now about tax and spending will likely be the same debates we are having six weeks from now. host: there's the u.s. debt clock. you can also see how much that is for individuals and what protection is moving ahead. our guest is damian paletta of the wall street journal. the covers finances and congress and the white house. his work is available online. from the senate floor yesterday, these comments by the senate democratic leader harry reid. [video clip] >> the speakership all members of the house back to washington today. he sh
this is coming up. the government will continue to function for a couple more months. emergency measures will be used to keep the money flowing, so to speak. this is unrelated to the fiscal cliff, so it's an additional problem that everybody has to deal with. of course the worst thing is we know how horrible it was the last time the debt ceiling needed to be raised in the summer of 2011, it went down to the wire and it looked as if there was a chance the united states would not raise the borrowing limit and default. we heard talk about social security payments not going out and that kind of thing. that's all led to the first downgrade in the u.s. credit rating, the stock market tanked. that was a ugly scenario. on top of the fiscal cliff, we may go through this all over again. it's another drag on the markets and on the whole economy at exactly the wrong time. >> when you say drag, though, give us an example of what you mean. we talked about january 2nd, everybody goes back to work and markets open. are we going to see a lot of volatility. all of a sudden it crashes down at once. what ha
a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. my wife takes centrum silver. i've been on the fence about it. then i read an article about a study that looked at the long term health benefits of taking multivitamins. they used centrum silver for the study... so i guess my wife was right. [ male announcer ] centrum. always your most complete. of green giant vegetables it's easy to eat like a giant... ♪ and feel like a green giant. ♪ ho ho ho ♪ green giant >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former la
't have a dramatic decline in their payments from the government, and certainly, that we're not going to do the sequester. we cannot tolerate, ordinary people can't tolerate these kinds of cuts in programs. >> absolutely. congresswoman jan schakowsky, thank you so very much. >> thank you. >> remember to answer tonight's question there at the bottom of the screen and share your thoughts on twitter @edshow and on facebook. i want to know what you think. >>> coming up, this congress is on track to be the worst congress ever. that's right. "the huffington post" amanda turco and robert reich will join me. >>> coming up, more on tonight's breaking news of the fiscal cliff with former labor secretary, robert reich, and amanda turco of "the huffington post." >>> then, chicago reaches the tragic milestone of 500 homicides in 2012. reverend jesse jackson will join me to discuss curbing gun violence in our cities. we'll be right back. >>> so the american people are watching what we do here. obviously, their patience is already thinning. this is deja vu all over again. america wonders why it is t
our government is trying to do with the bickering and tearing each other down, tearing the country down. why in the world can these supposedly intelligent groups of men and women not get together to work out for the best interest of all concerned, all 330 billion americans, what is the best course to take? just take it. none of this squabbling. get together, folks. let's have some harmony in warrington. that is what we need. we need more on selfishness. a lot less ulterior motives. no more 2000 page bills that no one can understand. we do not need more of that crap in washington. we need some representation. get your act together. >> we are going next to minneapolis, minnesota. john, welcome. >> all of this gridlock going on right now, what is clearly evident to me is that the republican party has pure interests in mind. they're willing to touch medicare and social security, but not their own salaries, no steps against their own party to take the needs of the american people. how can you act together with a party that works purely for their own interests. my question is -- what can
communications are looked at by the government. people want amendments. unfortunately congress once again is acting at the last minute trying to renew something about to expire and there is probably not the time to do revisions that are necessary. that's a problem here. harris: because critics want this to be revised as you just put it. the white house doesn't. it wants it to pass the way it is. a lot of people are in favor of it because it is helping to keep us safe since there is homegrown terror in the united states and we need to find it. i want to if which have the words put it up on the screen. kentucky senator rand paul had this to say on the senate floor yesterday. and what he was basically saying is that this interferes and disputes the power of the fourth amendment. and that it needs to be changed. again, dan, you say we may not see any changes to it because the deadline is tuesday? >> it is really important to note that even the supporters of renewing acknowledge there needs to be reform. there needs to be more oversight. we need to know more how the fisa court works. we want m
, to pay for more government spending that doesn't help us with the deficit. and you hear members of congress, your republican colleagues who say, in my district, they don't want more spending. and that's how they see this money being spent. >> two things i would say. first of all, that is not the democratic position. no one that i know of is arguing that all of the increased revenue should go for increased spending nap simply isn't the case. by the way not having the sequester doesn't mean increased spending. it mean not having spending cuts. i voted against the idea of a sequester. i think it's not right way to do it. what the republicans want to do is spend more on defense. let me deal with this notion that republicans for cutting spending. you heard mitt romney criticize president obama because he's not spending enough on ships, which we don't need, and not staying long enough in the war zones. the republicans' view of spending is very particular one. secondly, as far as the american people are concerned, people in their districts, gee, if they represent districts in new jerse
at the age of 85 who confronted the government of china in the organization's interest. and by 2007 their world summer olympic games were held in shanghai. shriver also advised the u.s. catholic bishops in drafting a letter on nuclear war issued in 1983, and he worked to influence the reagan administration to accept a no-first-strike approach to nuclear weapons. in 1993 president clinton presented him the presidential medal of freedom. this bare bones account of sargent shriver's life and achievements suggests but does not describe the spirit of a man who was a devout catholic and an inspired and inspiring father. how can we understand the spirit and motivation of such a versatile and resilient man? striving to understand sergeant shriver, i think of the inflated clown toy perhaps two-and-a-half or three feet tall favored by 2-year-olds around the world. and at the rounded bottom of the toy, there is a bag of sand so that no matter how often you push him down, he springs back upright again. it's great fun if you're 2, but sargent shriver was like that his whole life. no matter how m
in their wisdom sent a divided government to washington. off group of people in the house of representatives that basically slapped around their own leader and said we won't even consider a tax increase for millionaires, multimillionaires, billionaires. meanwhile, you have got the majority of the senators elected in this body saying we can do more at the top end. those of us who have a lot can get more revenue to address this crisis so you have got this stalemate that was created by two very different groups of people, all elected by the american people. >> now, walking out, i spoke to several of your colleagues, democratic senators who said they were not optimistic, really looking pretty glum. what camp are you in after what you just heard? do you think -- i mean, as you said, the clock is ticking, do you think by tonight or tomorrow, something will get passed to deal with at least the tax cuts that are going up by most americans? >> most successful businessmen and successful people i have talked to are willing to pay more and so it remains to be seen whether the republicans, being driven b
distract from what the country needs to do. we need to deal with our run-away government spending, the government is spending too much money. tax increases are not part of cutting the budget. tax increases are what politicians do instead of reforming government. as long as tax increases are on the table, the politicians never even think about reforming government. >> i understand you've been on this fight for a long time and you've been devoted to the whole idea of not seeing taxes increase anywhere. what we're down to is largely a political battle over the increase in marginal tax rates based on what you earn. i understand there's a lot more to this puzzle. but on that front, because that's the one that gets most of the ink around here. it's the whether people who earn more than 250,000 or 2z 400,000 or a million should pay more tax. the point i'm trying to get at is that's not going to hurt the economy. that's all we're talking about. paying 4.6 percentage points higher on your income over 250,000, the evidence isn't there that that's going to hurt the economy. >> it will take t
,000 a year would pay an extra two grand or so to the government. gregg: the big question, do lawmakers hope to get anything out of the last minute fiscal cliff talks or is it just for show? democratic congressman chris van hollen is the ranking member of the house budget committee. he will be joining us live coming up in the next hour what he really thinks is going on. patti ann: well the u.s. economy meanwhile could suffer yet another major blow. looming strikes at ports from next sass to boston are threatening to put thousands of americans out of work. with potential losses for u.s. businesses ranging in the billions. >> the port of baltimore is one of maryland's largest economic generators. any type of work action that may result in a suspension or stoppage of work would have an adverse effect. >> we handle more cars, we handle more farm and construction equipment than any other u.s. port. patti ann: we're learning that adverse effect could take a toll on the economy. fox business network's stuart varney has more for us on that this morning. good morning, stu. >> good morning, patti ann.
cannot go back and give money to people that can't survive the adjustment by government. this is very serious for working people and lower middle class people. >> you're absolutely right. this is a very serious matter. we need to work earnestly. the house members should be in washington. no reason to wait until sunday night. but i do want to say wup thing, al, and i think this is very important. one of the things that the house leadership is counting on is that we are so attuned to how serious this is that they're going to try to ram anything down our throat. now, let me tell you, we need a deal. we need a good deal. we need a fair deal. but we can't take any deal because this is a serious matter. we need to make sure that they don't make the poorest, vulnerable people pay for this thing. when they're talking about c cutting social security, i'm not guilty with that program. 2 million people's unemployment and a lot of other things -- sandy, help for sandy victims is all on the line here. we've got to get something done. >> i keep hearing this sad sacrifice like we had shared prosperi
serve to, "embarrass the administration, destroy the energy of government, and substitute the pleasure, caprice or artifices of an insignificant, turbulent, or corrupt junta to the regular deliberations and decisions of a respectable majority." good writer, that hamilton. but in recent years, the senate has been remade into a super majority constitution. disturb institution. you need 60 votes to get almost anything done. between 2009 and 2010, we had more filibusters than we had in the '50s, '60s, and '70s combined. and they're not filibusters like we think of them, where the senators go to the floor and debate an issue until they keel over from exhaustion. they're just obstruction. if you watch a filibuster today, it doesn't look like anything. it's the blue screen on c-span, the one with the classical music playing over it. you don't tune in to here an intense minority demand a great debate on the issue of the day. you tune in to hear a string quartet. senator jeff merkley, a democrat from oregon is trying to change that. he's got a proposal to force talking filibusters in the senate
a deep channel. >>> and america's population growth is slowing down. the government says it's due to lower birth rates during the economic recession and lower immigration numbers. as we start the new year, there will be 315 million people in the united states. the population, though, has grown less than .75% since 2010. so a slower rate of growth. still, 315 million people is -- >> seems like enough people in some places, that's for sure. thanks, lisa. >>> hopes have been crushed and families in the making ripped apart. a new law bans americans from adopting russian children. ng tom about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours. but we still need your signature. volkswagen sign then drive is back. and it's never been easier to get a passat. that's the power of german engineering. get $0 down, $0 due at signing, $0 deposit, and $0 first month's payment on any new volkswagen. visit vwdealer.com today. >>> from what we surmise, this meeting at the white house between the presiden
day pain relief with just two pills. >>> look, look. >> this is syria today. government war plains bombed the city of homs. it happened in alep powe as well. at least 80 people are reported dead across the country today. air strikes like these or in street fighting. these twin boys were among the 160 people killed in syria yesterday. it is so tragic. this is where they died. the man who shot this video said that syrian military artillery hit their home. it happen add few miles from where more than a hundred civilians died in a government air strike just a few days ago. >>> a man sent to syria to try to negotiate the end to the civil war says it could be over in a come of months. he's meeting with both sides in damascus, the rebels as well as the leaders. he speaks for thenited nations, not just syria. >> translator: some say i have come here to market a russian american project. i wish i could. there is no russian american problem so hence i did not come to market it. >> i want to bring in richard ross. brahimi is somebody who's very well respect bud somebody who's optimistic. when
the deficit, not new government spending. shannon? >> how confident are the "cook's essentialsal" democrats about the ability to get this done? >> reporter: congressional democrats do not sound over confident. they recognize this is a heavy lift between the top two senators in the next couple of hours. but a leading new york democrat sounded cautiously optimistic. >> there is certainly no breakthroughs yet between senator mcconnell and senator reid. but there is a real possibility of a deal. i have been a legislator for 37 years. and i have watched how these things work. they almost always happen at the last minute. >> reporter: we are getting down to the left minute. the threshold for extending the bush tax cuts. president obama campaigned campn capping it at $250,000, raising taxes on those who earn more than $250k, but some of the discussion and it is buzz around capitol hill has been about perhaps going to the $400,000 mark. the question is, will you get enough republicans to buy in if that is the deal? shannon? >> thanks to mike on capitol hill. we will continue to check in. now to ed
for them to be a governing party in any way, particularly in the house of representatives. they are an oppositional party there. but it makes it impossible for john boehner to govern in any effective way to make any sort of negotiation with the president to avoid a fiscal cliff. and the larger issue is that the national populous as a whole wants to see congress get stuff done. they want the accomplishments. so it works for republicans in some statewide races, mostly not but it's not a national agenda. >> allow me to reintroduce myself as a tea party spokesperson. what they say is they are a governing party. you said they're not. they say they are a governing party and they right now are causing the government to completely rewire the way that it deals with the deficit. and they say that there is pain in that process. but the long-term debate and the reason why they don't need to be inside the meeting room is they've got so many of the people in that room afraid of them that we are having a debate between how much to cut the deficit and not to do jobs or stimulus and the th
on all americans and a series of mandatory government spending cuts will kick in. hello, new year. hello, new recession. after two years of missing self-imposed deadline after self-imposed deadline, all eyes were on the senate over the weekend as the house's failure to even bring a plan to a vote left it up to the upper chamber to find a way out. vice president biden who had remained on the sidelines in this round of talks was even called in to help move things along. but as the saying goes, insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results. this morning, insanity continues as the clock ticks down and we have less than 17 hours to go. so joining us now to help us sort out this mess, we have former adviser to the bush administration and the romney campaign, dan senor. dan, will we go over the fiscal cliff? >> i'm afraid we will. i think it will get fixed right after right into the new year but i don't think it will get solved. >> something small, kicking the can down the road? >> correct. >> that same old thing. >> deal with the impasse until we get to t
down the deficit? if you are going to use it for more government spending we don't want a part of it. senator mcconnell on the republican side seemed to get frustrated because he felt like the democrats were slow walking the th, 18 hours without a response. mcconnell made a call to a well known senator, joe biden to see if he could help. >> we're willing to work with whoever can help. no single issue remains an impossible sticking point. a sticking point appears to be a willingness and interest or frankly the courage to close the deal. >> reporter: as senate aide says it was designed to try to jumpstart the talks and consequences of getting a tax increase is a huge concern. >> gregg: what went awry in these talks? >> you heard senator thune. a fiscal cliff deal is a new way calculating inflation that would lower social security payments. democrats say they would do it as part of much bigger deal but it was off the table for the smaller deal they are working on. so democrats called it a poison pill. >> at some point, negotiating process, it appears there are things that stopped us fro
a archaic 1947 law, unless the new bill is passed by december 31st, the government will be forced to buy vast quantities of milk at twice the wholesale rate. two bills are in congress. the senate passed one for $23 billion in savings. the house is looking to enact 35 billion. the sticking point the full house of representatives hasn't approved the bill. >> the farm bill is like this low hanging ornament on the congressional christmas tree that if they just embrace it, they can automatically come up with tens of billions of dollars in budget savings. and then they can figure out where else they need to cut spending after that. >> reporter: the secretary of agriculture tom vilsack has said his department is preparing a case the permanent law comes into effect. temporary solution is to attach a farm bill extension to the fiscal cliff legislation. harris? harris: is there anything besides milk we need to be aware of? are we looking potentially at higher prices among many farming commodities for example? >> reporter: yeah. it is not just the cows. it is the crops too. it is possibility the go
. the cuts, which are politically expedient, but costly to government expire in ten years time. >> both houses of congress have now passed a package of tax relief that will protect the middle class. >> when it came time for the cuts to expire, the u.s. is just emerging from the worst recession since the great depression. so president obama agreed to extend the tax cuts for two more years in exchange for congress extending federal emergency unemployment benefits. those cuts are expensive. if they're extended by 2020, the bush-era tax cuts will be responsible for more than half the total national debt. democrats insist that taxes go up for the wealthy but stay in place permanently for those earning less than $250,000 a year. >> we need to stop the job killing tax hikes, and we need to start cutting spending now. >> republicans refuse to play ball. they say no higher rates on the rich, no tax hikes on anyone. based on an ideology that calls for government to be as small as possible. the roots are as old as american politics, but today the philosophy's main spokesman is this man. grover nor
that problem? >> all we have to do to balance the budget in 10 years limit the growth of government spending so that the budget climbs by an average 2.5% a year. in my mind, this isn't about the short term because whatever speed bump we go over we're going to go over. in the long run that is what i'm worried about, how big is government? how much of our economy's resources will be diverted and consumed by government? because i don't want to become greece or france or one of these stagnant slow growth welfare states. think evidence is very clear that fiscal policy does matter for an economy's performance. doesn't mean we have a recession if taxes go up but it does mean that government will be bigger and our growth rate in the long run maybe instead of 2.7, it is 2.6. that doesn't sound like much but because of compounding it adds up. adam: dan, i don't think there is any danger we become greece or france in a lot of ways. we're not a socialist country yet and greece is a whole different ball of wax. rich, the discussion about the economy, the spending cuts that they're talking about do put peopl
the world. look at japan and europe. the japanese government is the glaring war on japanese citizens. it will create inflation. if the japanese citizens start to dump their bonds, they have been a bigger part then japan recently. that is a big problem for us. their euro has been quietly depreciating. if that goes out, that is a much bigger fiscal cliff. if the buyers of treasuries become sellers. liz: there are a lot of "if" in your discussion. the bond markets are still pretty -- nothing from the bottom vigilantes yet. you were a clinton advisor. you saw in the mid- 90s bond yields really spike higher. that is the issue. if we see the economy healing, bond yields could go up. investors say, wait a second, why invest for bond. >> that is the key issue. we have not seen interest rates spike for a simple reason. nobody has confidence in the economy. nobody believes we will have robust economic growth. we could be heading towards a recession. especially given the disappointing christmas sales. i am frankly skeptical about what will happen with our economy either way. i think we will go
to cut elsewhere. >> reporter: without new legislation, government price supports for milk will revert to 1949 levels. back then, the process was more laborious, and farmers needed a higher subsidy to cover their costs. dan summer, professor of agricultural economics at the university of california davis, says the new price of milk will be far above what it now costs dairy farmers to produce it. >> it really will be just chaos. nobody really knows how to act. >> reporter: so we would go back to this old farm bill, which would force the government to buy milk at an extremely high price. >> that's right. >> reporter: this could be a windfall for dairy farmers. >> here's the problem for dairy farmers: they don't want chaos in the milk market. it sounds good-- "gee, everybody will double or triple the price"-- but how much milk would people buy at that price? >> reporter: nobody will pay it. >> nobody will pay it. >> reporter: shoppers for milk today couldn't understand why congress can't at least solve this problem. linda vella: >> they all need to be fired. and if we want to continue to
among other factors the political brinksmanship of recent months that highlights america's governance becoming less stable, less effective, and less predictable. we believe this characterization still holds. do you know this congress, your congress, has done more harm than good? do you feel embarrassed being part of a congress that ranks up there with the do-nothing congresses of all time? >> i think america should be embarrassed by its leadership in washington, d.c. but that extends to the white house, senate, and house of representatives. this has been the most predictable disaster coming at us for a number of years, and certainly months. and the fact that we have been unable to do things and instead worried about our next elections instead of the next generation of americans, i think it's sinful and i hope that people turn out those who have been responsible for it. >> congressman, you're a straight shooter, we always appreciate you coming "outfront." >>> next, mixed feelings about gun control. most americans support a ban on assault weapons but also support the nra. >>> plus, alle
is about the fundamental difference, the role of government in americans' lives. lower taxes versus more of a social safety net. and every time they come close to an agreement, it falls apart because they have a fundamentally different idea on the issues. they have this divide in america, randy. >> so what happens next? how likely is it that we'll go over the fiscal cliff? i'm curious about the mood in washington right now. >> there is an increase in optimism because of the mood out of that meeting today. but i still would say the people who are -- placing bets in this town still expect that the nation will go over the fiscal cliff. so still a little bit more hope than what we woke up this morning, but no one is counting on being off on new year's eve. >> randy. >> jessica, thank you, more now on the raw politics, good to see you both. cornell, let me start with you here, the president said he wanted to see a straight up or down vote. as we mentioned that could happen in the senate. we could lose the up or down vote. >> you are going to see something come out of the senate. you have to p
and the republican parties. it's about the role of government in americans' lives. lower taxes versus more of a social safety net. and every time they come close to a deal, it falls apart because they have this fundamental disagreement about ideas. that's how we got here. they cannot agree on this basic notionation over this idealogical divide in america. >> what happens next? how likely it is we will go over the fiscal cliff. i'm curious what the mood is like in washington, d.c. right now? >> there's an infinitesimal improvement in washington because of the meeting today, but i still would say the odds, the people placing bets in this town still expect that the nation will go over the fiscal cliff. still a little more hope than when we woke up this morning, but no one is counting on being off on new year's eve. >> jessica, thanks. more now on the raw politics with "new york times" columnist raffle, and cornell belcher. the president said he wanted to see a straight up or down vote. as we mentioned, that will happen on monday in the senate. he could lose that up or down vote. >> what you'r
geithner says the government will hit the debt ceiling on monday and he is launching an emergency plan to avert a crisis. amm eamon javers is live. what do we know? >> the president is coming back early, a couple days earlier than his vacation. did a little bit of jogging, working out in the gym over his vacation. now he will be,ing would out on this fiscal cliff. the senate is coming back and the house of representatives is going to have a conference call for all republicans later on today and then yesterday, we saw the secretary of the treasury, tim geithner, announced the $16.4 trillion debt limit is going to be reached by monday, that was a little bit surprising to people who haven't been following this kind of thing and raises the stakes for the fiscal cliff end game because the white house had wanted a debt ceiling deal as part of the overall deal here on the fiscal cliff. republicans have been resisting that by announcing the debt ceiling limit will be held on monday, ratchets up the pressure to include the debt ceiling piece in the final package, whatever that may be, but still
base is just too great not to have a solution. so, you know, what makes this government work, is compromise, and, it is when you don't compromise, there is stasis -- >> you say 400,000 you could live with, not happily -- >> isn't that the question i will get asked? where does the money go? let's say it is $400,000. people vote $400,000, pay 39.3. >> chris: which is roughly $600 billion. >> if i'm asked at home, senator graham, what will we do with the money, what will i say. >> it is added to make up the deficit that everyone has been discussing -- >> it goes for -- >> not new spending. you know, you gets down to another thing, which was a very bad idea, and that is sequester. and whether sequester goes into effect or not. >> chris: well, that -- >> that is the 800 pound gorilla. >> chris: let me ask you about that. i enjoyed your brief state as the host of fox news sunday. >> i think it is a good jeegs i do, too. senator graham, all washington has been talking about is the tax side of the cliff. let's talk about intending side of the cliff, there is still as part of the clif
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